Films At The Stone | Memorial Foundation Film At the Stone Series
The Memorial Foundation presents Films at the Stone An inspiring summer film series located at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, 1964 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC.
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“The Films at the Stone is the first and only summer film series at a memorial on the National Mall.  The films are screened at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial and will display the best of human strength, love, and courage.”
–Harry E. Johnson, Sr. President and CEO, The Memorial Foundation, Inc

UPCOMING FILM SERIES

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. FILMS START AT 8:15PM
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THURSDAY JUNE 18

THURSDAY JULY 16

THURSDAY AUGUST 27

BLACK OR WHITE

When his wife dies in a car crash, Elliott Anderson (Kevin Costner) fields another blow: the realization that he must raise his biracial granddaughter, Eloise (Jillian Estell), alone. However, the child’s paternal grandmother, Rowena (Octavia Spencer) feels that she is better equipped to take care of the child, and sues for custody. With Eloise caught in the middle, both Elliott and Rowena are forced to confront their true feelings about race, forgiveness and understanding.

ANNIE

Ever since her parents left her as a baby, little Annie (Quvenzhane’ Wallis) has led a hard-knock life with her calculating foster mother, Miss Hannigan. However, all that changes when billionaire and mayoral candidate Will Stacks (Jamie Foxx) takes her in on the recommendation of his advisers (Rose Byrne, Bobby Cannavale). Stacks believes that he’s Annie’s guardian angel, but the plucky youngster’s confidence and sunny outlook may mean that Annie will save Will instead.

SELMA

Although the Civil Rights Act of 1964 legally desegregated the South, discrimination was still rampant in certain areas, making it very difficult for blacks to register to vote. In 1965, an Alabama city became the battleground in the fight for suffrage. Despite violent opposition, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (David Oyelowo) and his followers pressed forward on an epic march from Selma to Montgomery, and their efforts culminated in President Lyndon Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965.